Terry Redding's Master's Thesis
contents and abstract
May 1998

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TABLE OF CONTENTS


LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS..... iv

ABSTRACT..... v

CHAPTER ONE.
INTRODUCTION..... 1
Purposes And Justifications..... 4
Overview..... 10

CHAPTER TWO.
ANALYSIS FOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL USE OF THE INTERNET ..17
Chapter Overview..... 17
--Part I: Methodological Approach..... 18

--Part II: Literature Review..... 20
----- Section A: Theoretical Overview..... 20
-------A.1) Internet Theory..... 20
-------A.2) Communication Theory: Overview..... 25
---------- 2a) Foundational Theory..... 26
----------2b) Communication Research..... 33
---------- 2c) Cross Cultural Aspects.... 38
----- Section B: Literature on Internet Applications ...40
-------B.1) Anthropology..... 40
-------B. 2) Other Social Sciences..... 45
-------B. 3) Other Academic Disciplines..... 46
---------- 3a) Humanities.... 46
---------- 3b) Education.... 47
---------- 3c) Other Academic Resources.... 49
-------B. 4) Non-Academic Sources..... 49
---------- 4a) Business.... 49
---------- 4b) Other Areas..... 50

CHAPTER THREE.
INTERNSHIP CASE STUDIES...73
CHAPTER FOUR.
RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS
.... 102
  1. Potential Pitfalls.... 122
  2. Potential Benefits.... 128
  3. Conclusion ....144

REFERENCES CITED..... 146

APPENDICES..... 165



INTEGRATING THE INTERNET INTO APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY

TERRY M. REDDING

Master's Thesis
University of South Florida
May 1998
Major Professor: Gilbert Kushner, Ph.D.

The Internet represents a powerful new communication medium. In its present, early genesis, the medium already is being used in a variety of ways, including entertainment, research and communication applications by a range of corporations, institutions, agencies and individuals.

In this thesis I investigate the use of the Internet as a communication medium in applied anthropology. I report on and analyze information from three primary sources: from a review of the scholarly literature on the subject; from two internships, which I use as case studies; and from a review of the Internet itself, primarily through the World Wide Web. The analysis is presented from the perspective of how these various sources of information can assist in guiding applied anthropologists in using the Internet as a communication medium effectively, ethically and efficiently.

The first chapter outlines my justifications within applied anthropology for my topic selection. The second chapter presents relevant literature from scholarly journals as well as information from the Internet itself. This review offers a range of information covering several scholarly fields, reflecting the multi-disciplinary nature of applied anthropology applications of use. In the third chapter, two internships serve to add insights and information as to how applied anthropologists can use the Internet as an adjunct to their efforts. The fourth and final chapter provides further analysis, recommendations and conclusions, pulling together the diverse sources of information into a set of practical guidelines for the use of the Internet in applied and practicing anthropological endeavors. This chapter concludes with how this information contributes to applied anthropology and thus to a broader social context.

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